Freeriding safely: what’s important

Freeride Tipps: Sicherheit beim Tiefschneefahren Freeride Tipps: Sicherheit beim Tiefschneefahren

Ever more people are leaving the pistes for the open terrain, attracted by untouched slopes, fresh powder and extra fun. Freerider Garry Bachmann explains what to watch out for when freeriding.

Safety off-piste

There are plenty of dangers associated with freeriding. Avalanches, over­es­ti­mat­ing your own ability, making mis­judge­ments, losing direction and falling in the unknown terrain are just a few. To avoid any nasty surprises, there are a few «must knows» to keep in mind.

Skills of a freerider

To be able to ski or snowboard off-piste, you need:

  • Good skiing or snowboarding skills
  • Expertise
  • The right equipment and devices
  • Experience, respect for nature, and awareness of the risks

For Garry, a large part of it is being active outside in the fresh air. In the interview he gives on healthy habits he also tells us how he manages to incorporate this into his daily life.

Freerider Garry Bachmann on his passion for freeriding

Garry Bachmann tells us what fascinates him about freeriding and what he does to be able to practise it (in german).

Deep snow safety

Almost all ski resorts have off-piste downhill routes. These deep snow routes are marked yellow and are safe from avalanches. Away from these routes and the marked and safeguarded pistes, you are in open terrain. This terrain is neither safeguarded, groomed nor controlled. It's your responsibility here to assess the avalanche risk.

Expertise and experience are good, but not enough on their own.
Garry Bachmann

The right freeriding equipment

Emergency equipment includes:

  • Avalanche beacon (LVS)
  • Probe
  • Shovel
  • Avalanche airbag: releases in the event of an avalanche, increasing the person's buoyancy and is a good way of increasing safety
  • Mobile phone and first-aid kit for emergency situations
  • Helmet: especially off-piste, stones and rocks are partly covered by snow

In addition, you should always be in a group of at least 2 people so that you can help each other. Special freeride skis and snowboards also make it easier to descend in deep, unprepared snow, leading to a more fulfilling experience.

The equipment is required but hopefully never needed.
Garry Bachmann

Information on avalanche risk and weather

The WSL Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research (SLF) issues an avalanche bulletin daily at 8:00 and 17:00 in winter. The White Risk app also provides important information on the current avalanche situation as well as useful background knowledge for assessing the avalanche risk. To avoid any unwanted surprises, be sure to take a good look at the weather too.

Terrain and environment

  • Research thoroughly the physical features of the route (exposure, steepness, terrain, etc.). Maps, tour guidebooks and internet platforms (e.g. swisstopo.admin.ch, whiterisk.ch) can help.
  • Respect protected areas: the winter mountains don’t belong to sports enthusiasts alone. Adhere to the rules of the wildlife protection zones.

Knowledge can save lives

Knowing your facts can help to avoid many an avalanche accident. That's why it’s worth taking a freeride course where you will learn how to assess risks and receive helpful tips.

4 important principles according to Garry Bachmann

  1. Avoid the northern sector (NW-N-NE) when the avalanche level is considerable.
  2. Avoid rocky terrain (= 40°+) when the avalanche level is considerable.
  3. Listen to your gut feeling.
  4. Turn back / abort immediately if you hear any «whumpf» sounds. ALWAYS keep your distance in groups (going up and coming down).

What to do in an emergency

Reacting appropriately in an emergency is vital. If you're ever caught in an avalanche, immediately deploy your avalanche airbag if you have one. If you see other people caught in an avalanche, try not to let them out of your sight, and note the spot where they disappeared. Your own safety comes first. Do not act if you endanger your own safety in the process. Alert the rescue services immediately (Rega, tel. 1414 or via the Rega app). And then start searching immediately using your avalanche beacon.

It's worth taking a course

If you want to leave the marked and safeguarded downhill routes and head out into open terrain, we recommend that you first attend an avalanche course or hire an experienced snow sports instructor from the Swiss Ski School or a mountain guide from the Swiss Alpine Club.

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